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TECHNIQUE

The Savate Kicks

General kicking "THE CHASSE"
Chasse kicks are straight line kicks that travel with a “piston” like action, pushing out from you to hit a target then returning to a flexed position along the same line or trajectory. There are two forms of Chasse kick, Frontal and Lateral

Chasse Lateral. Lift the knee of the “kicking” foot towards it’s opposite shoulder, (left knee to right shoulder or vice versa) this motion will cause you to pivot on the supporting leg. Turn the outside edge of the striking leg towards ceiling, calf pressed against thigh. The ”kicking” foot should now be pushed out parallel to the ground towards its intended target. After hitting target pull leg back to flexed before either kicking again or “placing” the foot down.
It is possible to jump, skip or spin into a Chasse Lateral.
When using the left leg to kick with, use a strong left arm guard or vice versa using right leg.

Target area’s for Chasse kicks.
Bas:
Front face of legs.(above the knee but below groin.)
Median: Front of body. (Stomach, solar plexus and sternum.)
Figure: Front of head / face.







This illustration shows a fighter delivering a Chasse Lateral to mid section and head. In all of these illustrations the left arm should be slightly more bent at the elbow to create better protection for the head.









This illustration shows a fighter delivering a Chasse Lateral Bas, in the first picture his left knee is raised towards the right shoulder, which causes the fighter to pivot upon his supporting leg. He then pushes the sole /heel of the striking leg straight at the target area, if kick is aimed at low line target (as in this illustration) the supporting leg is bent to increase reach and lower centre of gravity.




This illustration shows a chasse marche croise – moving to adjust distance between kicker and opponent.










Note the right leg crosses behind the kicking leg before being raised to it’s opposite shoulder, in this illustration the kick is aimed at mid section.


Chasse Frontal: When delivering this kick, remain “square on” to opponent. Raise kicking legs knee towards its same shoulder, (left knee to left shoulder or vice versa) push the heel or sole of the striking foot towards proposed target. After hitting target pull leg back to flexed before either kicking again or “placing” the foot down. The kicker should keep both arms flexed in front of themselves, elbows touching each other to protect against possible incoming attacks.



This illustration shows the kicker “chambering” the knee before delivering a Chasse Frontal to mid section. To increase the efficiency of this kick the kicker’s hips and shoulders should be in line with each other. In order to gain distance, a “skip” or forward jump can be added from the chambered position, as the supporting foot should touches the ground the fully extended kicking leg hits it’s target.







In this illustration the kicker has jump / skipped into a chasse lateral to the head, the fully extended kicking leg should contact with the target at the same time as the supporting leg touches the floor. The skipping / jumping motion makes this “saute” kick a very powerful technique, if aimed at the mid section it can create a lot of room between fighters, by pushing one fighter clear across the ring.



Sweep kicking "THE COUP DE PIED BAS"
This kick has two purposes that are different depending upon whether you use the front or rear leg to perform the kick. In both cases the kicking leg pivots from the hip and remains fully extended, the foot acting like a match striking across the floor, lifting from the floor at the last possible moment and striking just above the opponents ankle.

Front leg coup pied bas: This kick is used to sweep an opponents feet away from beneath them. It travels in a circular motion and the inside, front third of the foot is used to make contact. It must strike below the knee but to be effective the lower the better.

Rear leg coup pied bas: This kick is used to attack the shin/ankle area of an opponent. The foot is “dragged” across the floor then “flicked” up off the ground at the last moment in a straight line towards the target. The inside, front third of the foot is used to make contact, this is a very effective “self defence” kick and is the only kick effective at “very close range.”




In this illustration the kicker starts from a “stance” position, delivers a Coup de pied bas using his rear leg, then returns to “stance”. Note the chin is tucked in as kicker strikes, this kick is a close range kick so care must be taken to ensure the chin is not exposed to attack.










In this illustration the kicker is trying to unbalance his opponent with a coup de pied bas kick using the front leg. Not the pendulum motion, as the foot sweeps, the head and shoulders pull back out of punching range.







Reverse kicking "THE REVERS"
There are two types of revers kick these are “frontal” and “lateral” - both are circular motion kicks but use different parts of the foot to strike the desired target. To increase power to both revers kicks it is simple and effective to either add a spinning movement before the kick or to utilise the spinning motion of a missed fouette kick !

Revers frontal: Standing “square - on” to the opponent swing the “fully extended” kicking leg across your other leg in a circular, crescent motion from the hip. When the desired height is reached pull the leg sideways striking the target with the outside edge of the foot (gain extra reach by pointing the toes towards the target) Complete the full circle and place the foot back on the ground, maintain a “square - on” stance at all times during the kick.

Target areas for all Revers kicks:
Bas:
Interior or exterior of the legs. (Above knee level but below hip/ groin)
Median: Sides of the body, prime target is lower or “floating” rib. If a sidestep or “decalage” movement is employed just before kicking it is possible to hit the centre/ front of an opponent.
Figure: Sides of head. If a sidestep or “decalage” movement is employed just before kicking it is possible to hit an opponent full in the face!




Here the kicker performs a revers to the head of an opponent using his front leg, the opponent has blocked the kick using his left glove to protect against the kick. The kicker in the illustration is not well organised in his defence, the arms ought to be flexed and in front of his body.





This next illustration shows a revers frontal kick to the head using the rear leg.

Revers lateral: Standing “square - on” to the opponent swing the “fully extended” kicking leg across your other leg in a circular motion from the hip. When the desired height is reached pivot on the supporting leg so the toes of this foot point away from the opponent and turn the outside edge of the kicking leg towards the ceiling. At this point you will be “side-on” to your opponent now pull the kicking leg back to the closed position “slapping” the target with the sole of the foot.
The “finish” position of a revers lateral is the “start” position for a fouette kick so the two kicks can easily be put together to form a “two kick combination”.



Here the kicker is completing a Revers Lateral bas, the sole of the foot “slapping” the inner thigh of his opponent.



Here the kicker is completing a Revers Lateral to the mid section, the sole of the foot “slapping” the side / floating rib of his opponent. Notice the full extension of the kicking leg; this keeps the kicker’s head out of punch range and therefore safe.


A Revers Lateral to the head, the sole of the foot “slapping” the side his opponents glove, the fully extended kicking leg keeps the kicker’s head out of punching range.


In this illustration the kicker has “spun” into a revers frontal to mid section, the spinning motion is the same for all “spin” kicks. The kicker could have aimed at any height target.






Circular Motion Kick "THE FOUETTE"
The Fouette kick is a “circular” motion kick that travels in a horizontal arc. To perform the kick you raise the striking leg, knee bent, towards your opposite shoulder (left knee to right shoulder or right knee to left shoulder.} As you do this “pivot” on your supporting leg and point the knee of striking leg, outside edge uppermost, at proposed target. Your calf muscle should at this point be touching your thigh, this position is known as “chambered” in English or “arme” in French. Finally “whip” open the striking leg to fully extended hitting your target.

A. The upper toe area of your boot for training or assaut.
B. The tip or point of the boot for self - defence or full contact competitions.

It is important to pull the leg back immediately after hitting the target and either kick again or “place” it back on the floor in the position required. Do not just let the leg drop after hitting target, as this will leave you “open” to be swept using Coup de Pied Bas.

Target areas for the fouette kick:
Bas: Interior or exterior of the legs. (Above knee level but below hip/ groin)
Median: Sides of the body, prime target is lower or “floating” rib. If a sidestep or “decalage” movement is employed just before kicking it is possible to hit the centre/ front of an opponent.
Figure: Sides of head. If a sidestep or “decalage” movement is employed just before kicking it is possible to hit an opponent full in the face!




1. This illustration shows a kicker in the “chambered or “arme” position, he is giving no indication as to where the kick will land. Inexperienced fighters will look at where they want to kick, an experienced fighter will read this information and move to the best position to counter against the attack.






2. This illustration shows a “fouette” bas using the front (left) leg. Note the kickers slightly flexed supporting leg, which lowers his centre of balance and gives him extra reach. His arms are flexed to guard against a possible counter attack.








3. Here left the kicker is delivering a fouette median using his front or left leg. Note position of right or “supporting” legs foot. It is important that this foot points away from your opponent.






4. Here right the kicker is delivering a fouette figure / head using his front or left leg. Note position of right or “supporting” legs foot. It is important that this foot points away from your opponent. When kicking to body or head the supporting leg should not be bent at the knee.




The Savate Punches

Jab & Cross "DIRECT"


Jab. (Direct Bras Avant)
A straight line punch starting and finishing in the “guard” position, it travels in the straightest line possible to and from its intended target, striking with the knuckles when the arm is fully extended and returning to the start position. This punch is the most used punch in most fighting arts, it is sometimes used as a dummy or feint, often it is used purely as a “range finder” to test how far away an opponent is.
Cross. (Direct Bras Arriere)
A straight line punch starting and finishing in the “guard” position, it travels in the straightest line possible to and from its intended target, striking with the knuckles when the arm is fully extended and returning to the start position.

These two long-range punches are the most commonly used hand techniques in nearly all fighting arts. The Jab is an excellent opening punch when putting together any punch combination, it is often thrown as a dummy or feint to draw an opponents attention. Often a Jab can be used to check how far away an opponent is, (even if opponent is out of “punching range”) before attempting a kick technique. The Cross punch is generally more powerful than the Jab but is slightly slower. Jab, Cross or Jab, Jab, Cross are both very common punch combinations.


To perform a direct punch: From basic stance push the punching arm forward with the palm of the hand uppermost, hips and shoulders remaining “square on”, when the arm locks, twist the hand over so that the palm faces ground, at the same time, turn the shoulder and hip to face opponent, tuck the chin in behind the raised shoulder and look straight down fully extended arm, keep the other hand up to protect the other side of the head. This twist of the body gives extra reach and power. Once target is struck, pull hand back to start position immediately to ensure you have adequate protection.


This illustration shows a Jab and a Cross to the head; note the positioning of the feet.


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